Working with mouldings

Useful videos, information and handy tips to help you get the job done

How to prepare my mouldings

Mouldings can be pre-painted or stained before being fitted and fixed into place, especially when there will be no visible nail holes.  The moulding may need to be sanded prior to installation if it is not completely smooth and it is much easier to sand a moulding before it is fitted.  

How to affix my mouldings

Mouldings can be affixed with either nails or wood adhesives. If nailing it is recommended to pre-drill the holes to avoid timber splitting. 

Finishing Your Mouldings - Sanding, Staining & Painting Tips

HELPFUL INFO

Finishing touches to any moulding will depend on how you want your finished project to look. Once the moulding is fixed into position you will need to fill any nail holes with the appropriate wood filler and lightly sand once it has dried. If the moulding has been glued into position ensure that you have allowed adequate drying time before working with the moulding.

Final finishes for the moulding may include:

Clear coat with varnish or polyurethane

This method keeps the natural look of the timber and provides protection as per the manufacturers’ recommendations. If applying multiple coats be sure to follow the manufacturers recommended drying times between coats and lightly sand with high-grade fine sandpaper (if required) before each additional coat.

Stain

There are two main types of stain one being just the stain that needs to be rubbed or brushed onto the timber and once applied it requires a clear coat over the top to give added protection to the timber. The desired colour for the final project may require multiple coats of stain or can be achieved with only one coat.

The other is a combined stain/varnish, which as its name suggests contains the stain colour and a varnish so that no additional coats are required once the desired colour is achieved. This product can have a clear coated added to maintain its durability at a later date.

Painting

Prime the timber with an appropriate timber primer and allow to dry prior to applying the top coat. If the timber is Porta pre-primed (white) it has already been coated with two coats of acrylic (water based) primer so that it is ready to paint with either an oil based or acrylic (water based) quality paint. Traditionally, oil based paint was the preferred choice due to its resistance to scratching and chipping but with the current paint technology there are numerous high quality acrylic (water based) alternatives available. The main advantage of acrylic paints are they dry much faster and less odour that oil based paints.

Other finishing options include Scandinavian Teak Oil & Linseed oil and Wax, all of which aim to enhance the natural beauty and characteristics of timber.

Visit your nearest Hardware store to view the vast range of finishing options available.

Handy tips when staining or painting your mouldings
  • Sand properly and thoroughly
  • Apply undercoat/first before installing 
How to finish my mouldings

VIDEO REQUIRED (Painting and Staining)

Finishing touches to any moulding will depend on how you want your finished project to look.  Once the moulding is fixed into position you will need to fill any nail holes with the appropriate wood filler and lightly sand once it has dried.  If the moulding has been glued into position ensure that you have allowed adequate drying time before working with the moulding.

Final finishes for the moulding may include:

 

  • Clear coat with varnish or polyurethane
    This method keeps the natural look of the timber and provides protection as per the manufacturers’ recommendations.  If applying multiple coats be sure to follow the manufacturers recommended drying times between coats and lightly sand with high-grade fine sandpaper (if required) before each additional coat.
  • Stain
    There are two main types of stain one being just the stain that needs to be rubbed or brushed onto the timber and once applied it requires a clear coat over the top to give added protection to the timber.  The desired colour for the final project may require multiple coats of stain or can be achieved with only one coat.

    The other is a combined stain/varnish, which as its name suggests contains the stain colour and a varnish so that no additional coats are required once the desired colour is achieved.  This product can have a clear coated added to maintain its durability at a later date.
  • Painting
    Prime the timber with an appropriate timber primer and allow to dry prior to applying the top coat.  If the timber is Porta pre-primed (white) it has already been coated with two coats of acrylic (water based) primer so that it is ready to paint with either an oil based or acrylic (water based) quality paint.  Traditionally, oil based paint was the preferred choice due to its resistance to scratching and chipping but with the current paint technology there are numerous high quality acrylic (water based) alternatives available.  The main advantage of acrylic paints are they dry much faster and less odour that oil based paints.

Other finishing options include Scandinavian Teak Oil & Linseed oil and Wax, all of which aim to enhance the natural beauty and characteristics of timber.

Visit your nearest Hardware store to view the vast range of finishing options available.

 

Joining technique - How to Mitre
Cutting a mitre for internal corners: 45 degrees
 

Measure as for external corner, however reverse the procedure when cutting as follows: For the left hand piece, the saw should be positioned 45 degrees from left to right. For the right hand piece, the saw should be positioned 45 degrees from right to left.

For the left hand piece, the saw should be positioned 45 degrees from right to left. For the right hand piece, the saw should be positioned 45 degrees from left to right

 

 

Joining technique - How to Splice
This is a neat method to join two lengths of straight moulding. 

Helpful Info

Position the moulding with the visible face edge uppermost in the mitre box (this ensures the saw cut on the visible face is clean and that any break-out will appear on the non-visible face of the moulding) with the back of the moulding against the back wall of the mitre box.

Mitre the joining ends at 45 degrees. The two pieces overlap making a diagonal joint.

For a stronger join, position spliced moulding ends in front of a stud so that the joining pieces can be nailed into the stud.

 

Joining technique - How to Scribe/Cope

Scribing is one of the key techniques for installing cabinets, countertops and built-in woodwork. Learn how to perfectly transfer odd shapes and wavy walls to your work piece, creating a perfect fit every time.

 

 

 

Joining technique- How to create a Butt Joint
A butt joint is a simple and common joint to construct, although the weakest.

In simple terms is made with two pieces of timber butted together at the ends

 

 

 

How to remove my old mouldings

Most often the existing mouldings have been nailed or glued in place. 

To safely remove find a gap between the moulding and the surface it is attached to using a flat blade screwdriver or the claw end of a hammer gently pry the moulding from the surface working from one end to the other removing nails as you work along the moulding. 

If you are working with a window or door frame you can use cardboard between the screwdriver and the existing surface when prying to help protect the other structured.